When does a prankster’s dream become political activism? When well over a thousand University of Texas students agree to strap a dildo to their backpacks in protest. Not over dorm security or cafeteria food, or even rightfully in protest of campus sexual assaults. No, UT students stand erect in opposition to conceal carry law SB: 11, which would allow any Texan over the age of 21 with a concealed handgun license to be armed on college campuses.

This law was born out of concern over the mounting attacks on students in schools and universities, a realistic fear when America reached 294 mass shootings in 2015 alone by October of 2015, 54 of those occurring in a school, with 142 mass school shootings since Sandy Hook in 2012. However, it is misguided to believe open carry will reverse those numbers, as experts agree that states with tighter gun laws have fewer gun related deaths, and the higher a state’s gun ownership count, the more deaths are attributed to guns. The correlation is there; the common sense laws are not.

UT’s stiffest protest, #CocksNotGlocks, stands against not only the quantity of guns this law might bring to its campus, but also against the downward spiral of quality SB: 11 would contribute to Texas campuses and their cultures.

Universities are supposed to be havens for free thought, exploration, pushing boundaries, having your outlook on life challenged, and learning to fail miserably. Universities thrive off the perspectives brought by international students and teachers, and continuing to open the doors for guns will shut the doors on many brilliant people who are unwilling to dance with our mess.”

This is Jessica Jin. Violinist. Texan born and raised. And the mastermind behind #CocksNotGlocks, the movement to arm every student at UT with a dildo.

After hearing a radio discussion about the Texas Southern University shooting on October 9th, Jin grew frustrated at individuals trying to explain-away or excuse repeated patterns of violence, and said to herself, “Man, these people are such dildos.”

Jin soon discovered that UT has policies prohibiting “obscene” writings or images in their penal code, meaning that brandishing a dildo is firmly frowned upon, while possessing concealed weapons in a classroom or residency will be the legal right of students and faculty after August 1st of 2016.

So Jin thrusted into action, starting a Facebook event and gaining support from UT students and staff alike, with over 200 professors pledging to ban guns from their classrooms. Among UT professors speaking out against SB: 11 is William McRaven, a retired Navy Admiral who organized and led the raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

#CocksNotGlocks has also garnered support from sex-toy suppliers, ensuring all willing and consensual participants will have a dildo in hand come August 24 2016, UT’s first day of fall classes and the kick-off of the #CocksNotGlocks event.

However, not everyone has been so supportive. The outcry against #CocksNotGlocks has illuminated the underlying racism and misogyny that exists within the pro gun movement. Jin has received death and rape threats, questions as to why, being a woman, she bothered going to school at all, as well as demands that she return to “her” country.

Jin says #CocksNotGlocks haters have employed “the submissive Oriental female stereotype, using caricaturish language to call me a slut. None of these insults are hurtful or surprising, because I’ve heard them all used on myself and other women of color before. Growing up as a minority woman in America certainly toughens you up a bit.”

So why dildos? Both gun violence and masculinity have been used time and time again to incite fear and exert power, making the dildo a compelling and humorous symbol to combat this trend. It is no surprise to Jin that the parading of the patriarchy’s most sensitive member in protest against guns would be a threat to the underlying hyper-masculinity guns represent, while also calling into question why our culture celebrates violence and condemns sexual expression.

Violence is obscene,” Jin insisted. “Why aren’t instruments of violence classified as such? Why should dildos be obscene if guns aren’t? The fact that we live in a culture which glorifies violence and vilifies sex shows that our priorities are completely sideways.”

The gun industry is a daunting opponent to take on, with the National Rifle Association investing $3 million annually into lobbying alone. Adam Winkler, a law professor at U.C.L.A., told The New Yorker, “N.R.A. members are politically engaged and politically active. They call and write elected officials, they show up to vote, and they vote based on the gun issue.” This level of engagement is not often matched by supporters of tighter gun control. Perhaps the NRA is offering a lesson here: a budget comparable to what Kanye spends on Kanye is not the only instrument of change; it can also be brought about by fierceness in the polls and high levels of engagement.

“The people who are taking their anger out on me are only looking for someone to blame for reminding thousands of people that throwing more guns at a gun problem is an obscene and backwards solution, if it’s a solution at all,” Jin says. “It’s a dangerous recipe for regressing society. #CocksNotGlocks caught on because of how easy it was for people to immediately see what’s wrong with our lax gun laws today. It was out in the open. It didn’t take a genius to simply point it out.”

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